Vibrotactile Feedback in Exoskeletons

Rehabilitation
Standing/walking/mobility
Online since 3 April 2024, updated 6 days ago

About this trial

This study aims to investigate the impact of providing discrete vibrotactile feedback related to weight shift and step initiation on exoskeleton use in individuals with motor-complete SCI....

Included participants

Gender
All
Age
≥ 18 years
Injury level
C1 - S5
  • Severity (AIS)?
  • AIS-A
    AIS-B
    Time since injury
    ≥ 6 months
    Healthy volunteers
    No
    C1-S5

    What’s involved

    Type

    Rehabilitation

    Details

    Rationale: People with motor-complete spinal cord injury (SCI) lack motor function below the lesion level and are, thus, wheelchair-dependent. In recent years, wearable exoskeletons have emerged as potential mobility devices for this population. Although exoskeletons generate the basic motions for ambulation, postural stability must be maintained by the user. People with motor-complete SCI miss essential somatosensory perception, which affects their ability to maintain postural stability. Hence, walking in an exoskeleton is demanding, and crutches are necessary. When sensory information of a specific system is lost, the lack of sensory information can be substituted by providing feedback to another sensory system. As sensory feedback has been shown to improve postural control in people missing essential sensory information, such sensory substitution may also be effectively incorporated in people with complete SCI using an exoskeleton. Objective: The study aims to investigate the effect of vibrotactile feedback on exoskeleton use in people with motor-complete SCI. Study design: The proposed study is an experimental study. The study protocol includes six sessions of 90 minutes spread over three weeks. Sessions one to five are dedicated to training to assess the effect of vibrotactile feedback on exoskeleton motor learning. Session six is dedicated to evaluation to assess the effect of vibrotactile feedback on exoskeleton motor control.

    Potential benefits

    Main benefits

    Standing/walking/mobility

    Additional benefits

    General health

    Good to know: Potential benefits are defined as outcomes that are being measured during and/or after the trial.

    Wings for Life supports SCITrialsFinder

    Wings for Life has proudly initiated, led and funded the new version of the SCI Trials Finder website. Wings for Life aims to find a cure for spinal cord injuries. The not-for-profit foundation funds world-class scientific research and clinical trials around the globe.

    Learn more

    • Trial recruitment status
    • Ended
    • Trial start date
    • 6 Mar 2023
    • Organisation
    • Sint Maartenskliniek
    • Trial recruitment status
    • Ended
    • Trial start date
    • 6 Mar 2023
    • Organisation
    • Sint Maartenskliniek

    Wings for Life supports SCITrialsFinder

    Wings for Life has proudly initiated, led and funded the new version of the SCI Trials Finder website. Wings for Life aims to find a cure for spinal cord injuries. The not-for-profit foundation funds world-class scientific research and clinical trials around the globe.

    Learn more