A Pilot RCT to Improve Cognitive Processing Speed in Acute SCI

Alternative or complimentary methods
General health
Online since 1 March 2024, updated 38 days ago

About this trial

This study seeks conduct a pilot study to test whether a cognitive training program can improve processing speed abilities in individuals with acute traumatic spinal cord injury....

Included participants

Gender
All
Age
18 - 59 years
Injury level
C1 - S5
  • Severity (AIS)?
  • Time since injury
    ≤ 6 months
  • Injury type
  • Traumatic

    Healthy volunteers
    No
    C1-S5

    What’s involved

    Type

    Alternative or complimentary methods

    Details

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) newly affects approximately 18,000 persons in the US per year. Decades of research have focused on the physical limitations associated with SCI, as well as therapies for addressing these physical problems. However, it is becoming better acknowledged that many individuals experience significant problems with their cognitive abilities, such as attention, memory, and the time it takes them to process information. Research has shown that people who have cognitive difficulties, compared to those with a purely physical disability, are less likely to be employed, engage in fewer social and work-related activities, have greater difficulties carrying out routine household tasks, and are at higher risk for mental illness. If cognitive issues arise after an SCI, it is more likely that a person would have a more challenging time adapting the many lifestyle changes brought about by their injury, would benefit less from their rehabilitation program, and have more difficulty rejoining the workforce. As it stands, cognitive assessment or rehabilitation is not part of the standard of care for individuals after their SCI because of the relative lack of research in this area. This study seeks conduct a multisite pilot study to test whether a cognitive training program can improve processing speed abilities in individuals shortly after they experience their SCI, with the hopes that this early intervention will improve the trajectory of their overall health and well-being.

    Potential benefits

    Main benefits

    General health

    Additional benefits

    Mental health

    Good to know: Potential benefits are defined as outcomes that are being measured during and/or after the trial.

    Wings for Life supports SCITrialsFinder

    Wings for Life has proudly initiated, led and funded the new version of the SCI Trials Finder website. Wings for Life aims to find a cure for spinal cord injuries. The not-for-profit foundation funds world-class scientific research and clinical trials around the globe.

    Learn more

    • Trial recruitment status
    • Recruiting soon
    • Trial start date
    • 1 Feb 2024
    • Organisation
    • Kessler Foundation
    • Trial recruitment status
    • Recruiting soon
    • Trial start date
    • 1 Feb 2024
    • Organisation
    • Kessler Foundation

    Wings for Life supports SCITrialsFinder

    Wings for Life has proudly initiated, led and funded the new version of the SCI Trials Finder website. Wings for Life aims to find a cure for spinal cord injuries. The not-for-profit foundation funds world-class scientific research and clinical trials around the globe.

    Learn more