Access-H20 Faucet for Spinal Cord Injury

Technology
Mental health
Online since 3 January 2024, updated 58 days ago

About this trial

The Phase I SBIR objective is to design, develop & demonstrate feasibility of Access-H2OTM, a sensor driven smart faucet to enable and empower independent drinking and grooming for individuals impacte...

Included participants

Gender
All
Age
18 - 90 years
Injury level
C1 - C6
  • Severity (AIS)?
  • Time since injury
    All
    Healthy volunteers
    Yes
    C1-C6

    What’s involved

    Type

    Technology

    Details

    Nearly 300,000 individuals are living with spinal cord injuries (SCI), and over 12,000 new SCI occur annually in the United States. Most SCIs involve the cervical (neck) region of the spine and cause partial or complete loss of movement of both arms, both legs, and the torso (quadriplegia). Individuals with a higher-level and more complete SCI typically have greater loss of functional movement and sensation below the level of the injury. They require greater levels of assistance for self-care and mobility. Currently, there are limited options for quadriplegics to access water to perform basic activities of daily living such as drinking. Additionally, hydration packs and straws create unsanitary conditions and can be difficult to use. The aim of the project is to develop an innovative fountain faucet to enable individuals living with SCI to access water more independently for basic activities of daily living. The faucet incorporates electromechanical controls and software programs that adjust spray outlets, spray angles, and water temperatures. A proximity sensor and voice recognition function allow users to control the faucet through a smart speaker. These features enable precise dispensing of water at the desired temperature and volume, while a camera and other sensors enable hands-free operation. Subjects, including individuals living with SCI and controls, were recruited from an outpatient rehabilitation clinic to test the functionality of the faucet including eye gaze, voice, and motion sensors to control the water stream for drinking, rinsing, and grooming. The examiner screened the subjects to determine their levels of functional independence (independent, modified independent, assistance required, and dependent). The participants were also interviewed regarding their current methods of drinking, rinsing, and grooming. The percentage and standard deviation of individuals in each level of independence for each function were calculated. A t-test was conducted to determine any significant differences in the dependence levels between the tested subjects and the control group.

    Potential benefits

    Main benefits

    Mental health

    Additional benefits

    General health

    Good to know: Potential benefits are defined as outcomes that are being measured during and/or after the trial.

    Wings for Life supports SCITrialsFinder

    Wings for Life has proudly initiated, led and funded the new version of the SCI Trials Finder website. Wings for Life aims to find a cure for spinal cord injuries. The not-for-profit foundation funds world-class scientific research and clinical trials around the globe.

    Learn more

    • Trial recruitment status
    • Ended
    • Trial start date
    • 15 Aug 2022
    • Organisation
    • Old Dominion University
    • Trial recruitment status
    • Ended
    • Trial start date
    • 15 Aug 2022
    • Organisation
    • Old Dominion University

    Wings for Life supports SCITrialsFinder

    Wings for Life has proudly initiated, led and funded the new version of the SCI Trials Finder website. Wings for Life aims to find a cure for spinal cord injuries. The not-for-profit foundation funds world-class scientific research and clinical trials around the globe.

    Learn more