Measuring the Neurological Benefits of Intermittent Hypoxia Therapy With MRI

Drug
General health
Online since 13 March 2022, updated 796 days ago

About this trial

This study uses Magnetic Resonance Imaging to image the brain and spinal cord before and after an Intermittent Hypoxia intervention. Acquiring these scans in patients with chronic cervical spinal cord...

Included participants

Gender
All
Age
18 - 60 years
Injury level
C2 - T1
  • Severity (AIS)?
  • Time since injury
    ≥ 6 months
  • Injury type
  • Traumatic

    Healthy volunteers
    Yes
    C2-T1
    Additionally, participants must
    NOT have any contraindication for MRI scanning

    What’s involved

    Type

    Drug

    Details

    Acute intermittent hypoxia (AIH) is an emerging, safe technique for facilitating neural plasticity in individuals with chronic spinal cord injury (SCI), demonstrating significant transient improvements in respiratory function, plantar flexion, locomotor function, and hand dexterity and strength. Although these studies observe some degree of success eliciting plasticity, we lack a framework for systematic optimization of the AIH protocol for individual patients. Better understanding of what physiological mechanisms drive AIH-induced neural plasticity in humans will directly inform the development of AIH as an effective treatment option in chronic SCI. This study applies magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to test how AIH influences vascular and neural properties of the brain and spinal cord. Individuals with SCI and uninjured participants will be recruited to undergo two MRI scan sessions on one day. In between these scan sessions, participants will undergo a single 30-minute session of AIH. In each scan session, functional MRI will assess AIH-induced changes in neural activation patterns during motor tasks (unilateral isometric hand grasping tasks) and vascular reactivity to breath hold tasks (transient hypocapnia to induce vasodilation). Additional structural scans will be acquired to aid in image analysis.

    Potential benefits

    Main benefits

    General health

    Additional benefits

    Good to know: Potential benefits are defined as outcomes that are being measured during and/or after the trial.

    Wings for Life supports SCITrialsFinder

    Wings for Life has proudly initiated, led and funded the new version of the SCI Trials Finder website. Wings for Life aims to find a cure for spinal cord injuries. The not-for-profit foundation funds world-class scientific research and clinical trials around the globe.

    Learn more

    • Trial recruitment status
    • Ended
    • Trial start date
    • 20 May 2019
    • Organisation
    • Northwestern University
    • Trial recruitment status
    • Ended
    • Trial start date
    • 20 May 2019
    • Organisation
    • Northwestern University

    Wings for Life supports SCITrialsFinder

    Wings for Life has proudly initiated, led and funded the new version of the SCI Trials Finder website. Wings for Life aims to find a cure for spinal cord injuries. The not-for-profit foundation funds world-class scientific research and clinical trials around the globe.

    Learn more