Spinal Stimulation Sit-to-Stand Training After Spinal Cord Injury

Technology
Standing/walking/mobility
Online since 3 November 2021, updated 839 days ago

About this trial

This is a trial to test whether a skin surface spinal stimulation device applied to the lower back helps individuals with spinal cord injury to stand up. The goal of the study is to see if stimulation is better than regular sit-to-stand training (repeated standing up from a chair and sitting down again using a Keiser Power Rack) to improve standing ability, bladder function, and well-being. Participants will participate in 24, 1-hour training sessions, 3 times per week, over 8 weeks at Neurokinex in London (UK). There will be two study groups: One will receive sit-to stand training alone; the other will receive sit to stand training combined with spinal stimulation.

Included participants

Gender
All
Age
≥ 18 years
Injury level
C5 - T12
  • Severity (AIS)?
  • AIS-A
    AIS-B
    AIS-C
    AIS-D
    Time since injury
    ≥ 1 year
  • Injury type
  • Traumatic

    Non-traumatic

    Healthy volunteers
    No
    C5-T12
    Additionally, participants must
    be unable to stand up from a chair without help.
    NOT have an implanted device, e.g., pacemaker

    What’s involved

    Type

    Technology

    Details

    A first 1-2 hour testing session at the Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital, to test the SS electrodes to assist or activate different movements (e.g. bring knee to chest when lying down on the back). A second 45-minute testing session at the Neurokinex Rehabiliation Center to test the effect of on and off SS during sit-to-stand movements. 24, 1-hour training sessions, each one hour, 3 times per weeks, over 8 weeks at the Neurokinex rehabilitation center in London of either 1) sit-to-stand training combined with SS or 2) sit-to-stand training alone.

    Potential benefits

    Main benefits

    Standing/walking/mobility

    Additional benefits

    Arm/hand function

    Bladder health

    General health

    Mental health

    Good to know: Potential benefits are defined as outcomes that are being measured during and/or after the trial.

    Wings for Life supports SCITrialsFinder

    Wings for Life has proudly initiated, led and funded the new version of the SCI Trials Finder website. Wings for Life aims to find a cure for spinal cord injuries. The not-for-profit foundation funds world-class scientific research and clinical trials around the globe.

    Learn more

    • Trial recruitment status
    • Ended
    • Trial start date
    • 24 Jul 2018
    • Organisation
    • University College, London
    • Trial recruitment status
    • Ended
    • Trial start date
    • 24 Jul 2018
    • Organisation
    • University College, London

    Wings for Life supports SCITrialsFinder

    Wings for Life has proudly initiated, led and funded the new version of the SCI Trials Finder website. Wings for Life aims to find a cure for spinal cord injuries. The not-for-profit foundation funds world-class scientific research and clinical trials around the globe.

    Learn more