Sensory Motor Transformations in Human Cortex

Technology
Arm/hand function
Online since 8 November 2021, updated 834 days ago

About this trial

This trial is recruiting individuals with chronic cervical (neck area) spinal cord injuries to test the safety and effectiveness of an implanted device to control a computer or other device by thoughts. Researchers also want to see if the device (Neuroport Array) provides participants with sensory feedback. The study involves implantation of three electrode arrays into the surface of the brain over areas that control reach and grasp movement, as well as sensory awareness of the hand and fingers. This brain wave information can be used to train participants to move a computer cursor or robotic arm. A sensory awareness array can be used to provide stimulation to sensory circuits in the brain in order to simulate touch and “feel” of an object. It is hoped that the addition of sensory feedback will allow better control of simulated movements. Participants will receive surgery to implant the electrodes and subsequent training sessions up to 3-5 times a week. The study lasts one year after implantation.

Included participants

Gender
All
Age
22 - 65 years
Injury level
C1 - C5
  • Severity (AIS)?
  • AIS-A
    AIS-B
    AIS-C
    AIS-D
    Time since injury
    ≤ 65 years
  • Injury type
  • Traumatic

    Healthy volunteers
    No
    C1-C5
    Additionally, participants must
    NOT have other implanted device, e.g. pacemaker

    What’s involved

    Type

    Technology

    Details

    Surgery through the scalp and skull to implant the microarrays into the brain. Three arrays are implanted with each attached to a ¾ inch (1.9 cm) wide pedestal that protrudes through the scalp with connectors for electronic attachment to a computer processors and stimulator. Following surgical recovery the subject will participate in study sessions 3-5 times per week in which they will learn to control a robotic arm or computer-generated images by thought and with sensory feedback via intracortical microstimulation.

    Potential benefits

    Main benefits

    Arm/hand function

    Additional benefits

    General health

    Mental health

    Sensory function

    Good to know: Potential benefits are defined as outcomes that are being measured during and/or after the trial.

    Wings for Life supports SCITrialsFinder

    Wings for Life has proudly initiated, led and funded the new version of the SCI Trials Finder website. Wings for Life aims to find a cure for spinal cord injuries. The not-for-profit foundation funds world-class scientific research and clinical trials around the globe.

    Learn more

    • Trial recruitment status
    • Recruiting
    • Trial start date
    • 1 Nov 2013
    • Organisation
    • California Institute of Technology
    • Trial recruitment status
    • Recruiting
    • Trial start date
    • 1 Nov 2013
    • Organisation
    • California Institute of Technology

    Wings for Life supports SCITrialsFinder

    Wings for Life has proudly initiated, led and funded the new version of the SCI Trials Finder website. Wings for Life aims to find a cure for spinal cord injuries. The not-for-profit foundation funds world-class scientific research and clinical trials around the globe.

    Learn more