Exoskeleton Use With In Home Functional Activities

Rehabilitation
Mental health
Online since 19 February 2024, updated 51 days ago

About this trial

The purpose of this study is to observe current exoskeleton users in their home environment to determine the activities of daily living (ADLs) they are able to complete, and to identify the minor adap...

Included participants

Gender
All
Age
≥ 18 years
Injury level
C1 - S5
  • Severity (AIS)?
  • Time since injury
    All
    Healthy volunteers
    Yes
    C1-S5

    What’s involved

    Type

    Observational

    Details

    The exoskeleton is a wearable robotic device that provides the ability to walk to those with spinal cord injury, or other neurological injuries who have lost their ability to walk and are wheelchair dependent. There are multiple health benefits to regaining the ability to adopt a standing posture, even for brief periods of time, including issues that are common with chronic wheelchair use such as pressure ulcers, bowel and bladder disorders, spasticity, and pain. Although there is a large amount of literature regarding people walking with the assistance of an exoskeleton, there is a dearth in the literature regarding use of an exoskeleton to complete normal activities of daily living (ADL) in the home environment. To date, no studies have been done assessing what the patient can do in their home environment while wearing the exoskeleton. The information that exists on the topic has been obtained primarily through interviews and surveys asking the patient to contemplate how to improve the exoskeleton, but patients have not been asked to complete ADLs wearing the exoskeleton, and their ability to do ADLs while using the exoskeleton has not been observed. As the ability to complete ADLs in standing would increase the usability of the exoskeleton, which would allow patients to wear them more frequently, and potentially for longer periods of time, this is a critical research gap. There is potential for physiological and psychological benefit to exoskeleton users with this increased use. It is possible that minor alterations in their environment could provide the opportunity for exoskeleton users to be independent, or nearly independent in some ADLs if their environment is set up for them. To determine these two points further research is indicated. Specifically, for this study, patients who currently wear an exoskeleton will be observed in their home environment to determine the activities of daily living (ADLs) they are able to complete, and to identify the minor adaptations to the home environment that will improve the exoskeleton user's potential for increased independence. There will be one home visit where the environment for the patient will be adjusted as necessary (e.g. put necessary items on the counter or vanity so the patient can make a sandwich standing at the counter, or brush their teeth standing at the vanity). This minor adaptation provides easier access to items associated with activities of daily living. During this first visit, patients will complete several outcomes measures. The same outcome measures will be completed remotely, by phone or video call, by patients again at 1, 3, 6, 9, and 12 months post-initial home visit to determine if patients experience any change in the outcome measures (pain, quality of life, self-perception of task performance).

    Potential benefits

    Main benefits

    Mental health

    Additional benefits

    Arm/hand function

    General health

    Pain

    Standing/walking/mobility

    Good to know: Potential benefits are defined as outcomes that are being measured during and/or after the trial.

    Wings for Life supports SCITrialsFinder

    Wings for Life has proudly initiated, led and funded the new version of the SCI Trials Finder website. Wings for Life aims to find a cure for spinal cord injuries. The not-for-profit foundation funds world-class scientific research and clinical trials around the globe.

    Learn more

    • Trial recruitment status
    • Recruiting
    • Trial start date
    • 10 Feb 2024
    • Organisation
    • A.T. Still University of Health Sciences
    • Trial recruitment status
    • Recruiting
    • Trial start date
    • 10 Feb 2024
    • Organisation
    • A.T. Still University of Health Sciences

    Wings for Life supports SCITrialsFinder

    Wings for Life has proudly initiated, led and funded the new version of the SCI Trials Finder website. Wings for Life aims to find a cure for spinal cord injuries. The not-for-profit foundation funds world-class scientific research and clinical trials around the globe.

    Learn more