The Enteric Nervous System in Spinal Cord Injury: Study of the Enteric Nervous System and the Intestinal Epithelial Barrier Via Colonic Biopsies in Spinal Cord Injury Patients

Alternative or complimentary methods
Bowel health
Online since 12 September 2023, updated 167 days ago

About this trial

The goal of this clinical trial is to learn more about the enteric nervous system (ENS) and the intestinal epithelial barrier (IEB) in patients with spinal cord injury (SCI). The main questions it aim...

Included participants

Gender
All
Age
18 - 80 years
Injury level
C1 - S5
  • Severity (AIS)?
  • Time since injury
    All
    Healthy volunteers
    No
    C1-S5

    What’s involved

    Type

    Alternative or complimentary methods

    Details

    Injury to the spinal cord, whether traumatic or not, leads to numerous organ deficiencies, particularly vegetative deficiencies. Digestive and anorectal dysfunctions are among these, and are the main deficiencies that spinal cord injury patients would like to see disappear, even before motor recovery or walking, for example. However, the treatments available are essentially empirical (dietary hygiene rules, use of laxatives, digital exoneration maneuvers) and only partially effective. Pathophysiological knowledge of digestive dysfunction in the medullo-injured is mainly focused on dysfunctions of extrinsic vegetative innervation. In contrast, there are few studies concerning the dysfunction of intrinsic digestive innervation in this pathology, i.e. the enteric nervous system (ENS), and the intestinal epithelial barrier (IEB), which are central players involved in the digestive disorders observed during the course of numerous digestive or extra-digestive pathologies, such as Parkinson's Disease (PD) in particular. To date, the nature of ENS/EIB remodeling has not been correlated with clinical data, in order to potentially link it to a clinical phenotype of these patients, and to determine their capacity to become predictive biomarkers of disease progression, severity and/or response to treatment. By combining functional exploration of the intestinal barrier, protein and transcriptomic analysis of biopsies, the aim is to 1) characterize functional (permeability, serotonin production), proteomic and transcriptomic remodeling of the mucosa in SCI patients compared with control groups, 2) make the link with patients' clinical data, 3) identify markers of disease severity (lesion level, severity of intestinal dysfunction) and 4) identify therapeutic targets that could be tested in the animal model before being proposed in clinical trials.

    Potential benefits

    Main benefits

    Bowel health

    Additional benefits

    Good to know: Potential benefits are defined as outcomes that are being measured during and/or after the trial.

    Wings for Life supports SCITrialsFinder

    Wings for Life has proudly initiated, led and funded the new version of the SCI Trials Finder website. Wings for Life aims to find a cure for spinal cord injuries. The not-for-profit foundation funds world-class scientific research and clinical trials around the globe.

    Learn more

    • Trial recruitment status
    • Recruiting
    • Trial start date
    • 24 Jul 2023
    • Organisation
    • Nantes University Hospital
    • Trial recruitment status
    • Recruiting
    • Trial start date
    • 24 Jul 2023
    • Organisation
    • Nantes University Hospital

    Wings for Life supports SCITrialsFinder

    Wings for Life has proudly initiated, led and funded the new version of the SCI Trials Finder website. Wings for Life aims to find a cure for spinal cord injuries. The not-for-profit foundation funds world-class scientific research and clinical trials around the globe.

    Learn more