Non-invasive Therapy to Drive Nerve Regeneration

Drug
Arm/hand function
Online since 30 December 2023, updated 51 days ago

About this trial

Peripheral nerve injuries are common and often associated with poor outcomes including incomplete repair, debilitating pain states and compromised function. Although nerve regeneration can be enhanced...

Included participants

Gender
All
Age
18 - 60 years
Injury level
C1 - S5
  • Severity (AIS)?
  • Time since injury
    All
    Healthy volunteers
    No
    C1-S5

    What’s involved

    Type

    Drug

    Details

    Peripheral nerve injuries are frequent and disabling, often with irreversible consequences. Injured sensory and motor neurons induce cellular and molecular events we refer to as the intrinsic repair program, linked to their regeneration capacity. Regrettably, regeneration of these nerves is challenging. Issues include whether the intrinsic repair program is robust enough, or is sustained long enough, to ensure repair over long distances. This can result in incomplete repair and/or pain states. The investigators will exploit acute intermittent hypoxia (intermittent periods of reduced oxygen), a novel treatment to condition/prime peripheral nerves and induce an enhanced intrinsic repair program. Acute intermittent hypoxia is non-invasive and has a systemic effect which is a major advantage in cases where there are multiple nerve injured in a widespread distribution, as opposed to electrical stimulation that only impacts the individual nerve stimulated. However, the full potential of acute intermittent hypoxia in nerve repair remains unknown. This will be a Phase I randomized control trial of carpal tunnel syndrome associated with severe median nerve compression/injury. This is designed to test the hypothesis that acute intermittent hypoxia before and/or after nerve decompression will result in more effective nerve regeneration and restoration of function. Methods: Using a double blinded randomized controlled trial design, we will recruit 80 adult patients (50% male; 50% female) >18 yrs old with severe carpal tunnel syndrome. Statistical analysis: Distribution of the outcome data will be analyzed using the Shapiro-Wilk test. For parameters that are normally distributed, differences between the groups will be compared using 2-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) with time and treatment allocation being the independent factors. When a statistically significant difference (p<0.05) is found, post hoc testing will be done using the Tukey test. For data that is not normally distribution, the Kruskal-Wallis test will be used instead, followed by post hoc analysis with Dunn's test when a significant difference is found. Sample size estimation - Assuming that AIH has a modest treatment effect size of 0.6 compared to the Normoxia control group, with type I error set at 0.05 and type II error at 0.80, appropriately 20 subjects are needed in each group to provide sufficient power for the study.

    Potential benefits

    Main benefits

    Arm/hand function

    Additional benefits

    Sensory function

    Good to know: Potential benefits are defined as outcomes that are being measured during and/or after the trial.

    Wings for Life supports SCITrialsFinder

    Wings for Life has proudly initiated, led and funded the new version of the SCI Trials Finder website. Wings for Life aims to find a cure for spinal cord injuries. The not-for-profit foundation funds world-class scientific research and clinical trials around the globe.

    Learn more

    • Trial recruitment status
    • Recruiting soon
    • Trial start date
    • 1 Jan 2024
    • Organisation
    • University of Alberta
    • Trial recruitment status
    • Recruiting soon
    • Trial start date
    • 1 Jan 2024
    • Organisation
    • University of Alberta

    Wings for Life supports SCITrialsFinder

    Wings for Life has proudly initiated, led and funded the new version of the SCI Trials Finder website. Wings for Life aims to find a cure for spinal cord injuries. The not-for-profit foundation funds world-class scientific research and clinical trials around the globe.

    Learn more