Non-Invasive Spinal Cord Stimulation After Injury

Technology
General health
Online since 4 November 2021, updated 887 days ago

About this trial

This study is enrolling individuals with chronic spinal cord injuries to test the effect on breathing function of non-invasive (skin-surface, or transcutaneous) electrical spinal cord stimulation (TcESCS) combined with muscle training. TcESCS is a technique for activating spinal cord nerve networks, using up to five surface electrodes on the skin at the neck (cervical) and lower back (lumbar) levels. TcESCS will be combined with either breathing exercises, arm exercises or trunk training. Investigators will be looking for changes in the function of the lungs and trunk muscles before, during, and after the interventions. Participants will be randomly assigned to one of four study groups: TcESCS alone, TcESCS + respiratory training, TcESCS + arm training, and TcESCS + trunk training).

Included participants

Gender
All
Age
21 - 65 years
Injury level
C1 - T10
  • Severity (AIS)?
  • AIS-A
    AIS-B
    AIS-C
    AIS-D
    Time since injury
    2 years - 65 years
  • Injury type
  • Traumatic

    Healthy volunteers
    Yes
    C1-T10
    Additionally, participants must
    have at least a 25% deficit in pulmonary function outcomes detected by screening spirometry
    NOT be dependent on ventilator

    What’s involved

    Type

    Technology

    Details

    Informed Consent followed by random assignment to one of the study groups (TcESCS alone, TcESCS+respiratory training, TcESCS+arm training, and TcESCS+trunk training) Participation in multiple sessions of TcESCS with or without specific training, as assigned Periodic assessment of intervention outcomes until completion of study participation (an average of 1 year) Intervention details such as number and duration of sessions, training activities, etc. are not provided. Further information should be acquired directly from the investigator.

    Potential benefits

    Main benefits

    General health

    Additional benefits

    Arm/hand function

    Standing/walking/mobility

    Good to know: Potential benefits are defined as outcomes that are being measured during and/or after the trial.

    Wings for Life supports SCITrialsFinder

    Wings for Life has proudly initiated, led and funded the new version of the SCI Trials Finder website. Wings for Life aims to find a cure for spinal cord injuries. The not-for-profit foundation funds world-class scientific research and clinical trials around the globe.

    Learn more

    • Trial recruitment status
    • Recruiting
    • Trial start date
    • 17 May 2018
    • Organisation
    • University of Louisville
    • Trial recruitment status
    • Recruiting
    • Trial start date
    • 17 May 2018
    • Organisation
    • University of Louisville

    Wings for Life supports SCITrialsFinder

    Wings for Life has proudly initiated, led and funded the new version of the SCI Trials Finder website. Wings for Life aims to find a cure for spinal cord injuries. The not-for-profit foundation funds world-class scientific research and clinical trials around the globe.

    Learn more