Improving Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation Interventions by Retraining the Brain With Stimulation

Technology
Arm/hand function
Online since 1 November 2021, updated 890 days ago

About this trial

This study is recruiting individuals with incomplete cervical (neck area) spinal cord injuries to determine whether non-invasive, skin-surface electrical stimulation of the brain improves conventional rehabilitation therapy. The stimulation (transcranial direct current stimulation - tDCS) is delivered over the scalp with a low intensity current; the technique is well-established and considered to be reasonably safe. Researchers want to see if tDCS stimulation, delivered along with rehabilitation, strengthens nerve pathways (plasticty) that may in turn improve function. Participants will receive upper extremity exercises for two hours per day, five times a week for two weeks. The study design requires a placebo control group, so half of the participants will do the same exercises without the tDCS. Due to the low intensity of tDCS, participants will not be able to tell whether they are receiving active or placebo tDCS.

Included participants

Gender
All
Age
18 - 75 years
Injury level
C1 - C8
  • Severity (AIS)?
  • AIS-B
    AIS-C
    AIS-D
    Time since injury
    6 months - 75 years
  • Injury type
  • Traumatic

    Non-traumatic

    Healthy volunteers
    Yes
    C1-C8
    Additionally, participants must
    NOT have shunts or other implanted devices
    NOT use anticonvulsants, antidepressants, or psychotropic medications (except anti-spasticity or pain medications)

    What’s involved

    Type

    Technology

    Details

    A control phase two weeks prior to the study. No surgery needed. tDCS or sham tDCS, during rehabilitation exercises of the weak upper limbs for 2 hours per day, 5 times a week, for 2 weeks. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain. Follow-up measures up to 3 months.

    Potential benefits

    Main benefits

    Arm/hand function

    Additional benefits

    General health

    Good to know: Potential benefits are defined as outcomes that are being measured during and/or after the trial.

    Wings for Life supports SCITrialsFinder

    Wings for Life has proudly initiated, led and funded the new version of the SCI Trials Finder website. Wings for Life aims to find a cure for spinal cord injuries. The not-for-profit foundation funds world-class scientific research and clinical trials around the globe.

    Learn more

    • Trial recruitment status
    • Ended
    • Trial start date
    • 1 Nov 2011
    • Organisation
    • The Cleveland Clinic
    • Trial recruitment status
    • Ended
    • Trial start date
    • 1 Nov 2011
    • Organisation
    • The Cleveland Clinic

    Wings for Life supports SCITrialsFinder

    Wings for Life has proudly initiated, led and funded the new version of the SCI Trials Finder website. Wings for Life aims to find a cure for spinal cord injuries. The not-for-profit foundation funds world-class scientific research and clinical trials around the globe.

    Learn more